Biostatistics

Program Description

Biostatistics is the study of statistical estimation and inference in the context of biology and the health sciences. The domain encompasses a wide range of topics, such as statistical genetics, design and analysis of randomized control trials, modelling time-to-event data. Research in biostatistics is often motivated by particular biomedical questions or applications which raise methodological investigations into a general mathematical or statistical framework of the problem. Thus, biostatistics is a discipline which requires both a solid foundation in inference and asymptotic theory mixed with versatility and interdisciplinary collaborative skills. A sample of areas of interest of the group members includes the following topics:

  •  survival analyses
  •  statistical genetics
  •  causal inference
  •  methodology for longitudinal data

Specific techniques developed or extended in the group include semi- and non-parametric response modelling, data quality in genomic studies, Bayesian techniques for diagnostic testing, g-estimation and inference of dynamic treatment regimes, and high-dimensional propensity scores.

Program Members

2019-20 Course Listings

Winter

Epidemiology: Regression Models II

Multivariable regression models for proportions, rates, and their differences/ratios; Conditional logistic regression; Proportional hazards and other parametric/semi-parametric models; unmatched, nested, and self-matched case-control studies; links to Cox's method; Rate ratio estimation when "time-dependent" membership in contrasted categories.

Prof. Erica Moodie

BIOS 602

Institution: McGill University

Advanced Modelling: Survival and Other Multivariate Data

Advanced applied biostatistics course dealing with flexible modeling of non-linear effects of continuous covariates in multivariable analyses, and survival data, including e.g. time-varying covariates and time-dependent or cumulative effects. Focus on the concepts, limitations and advantages of specific methods, and interpretation of their results. In addition to 3 hours of weekly lectures, shared with epidemiology students, an additional hour/week focuses on statistical inference and complex simulation methods. Students get hands-on experience in designing and implementing simulations for survival analyses, through individual term projects.

Prof. Michal Abrahamowicz

BIOS 637

Institution: McGill University